Youth Protecting Youth

Defending the Dignity of All Human Life


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An Unpleasant Truth

by Kamilah Thorpe

Last year around this time, YPY members participated in “Choice Chain” on the campus of UVic. Choice Chain is a display of graphic images which show the horrors of abortion. Many people were offended and disgusted by the horrible images of aborted fetuses that we chose to expose to the public that day.

I myself am horrified and disgusted by the images and will be the last person to deny that they can be emotionally traumatizing.

But they are true.

The reason that I participated in Choice Chain that day despite my discomfort with the images was because I believe that people need to know the truth. I cannot allow the bodies of those dead children to be left hidden behind clinic walls and disguised under idealistic mantras that cry “pro-Choice”. I want people to see with their own eyes what that “Choice” really is.

If we deny the truth we will never change and we will never heal. That is why I held that sign last year and that is why I would hold it again and again until everyone knows the truth about abortion.

I look forward to the day when people will remember those terrible pictures as something horrible that used to happen in our country.

But today it is still happening, and that is why YPY continues to fight to expose the horrors of abortion to the public, despite any opposition we might encounter.


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New Year, New Life

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By Kamilah Thorpe

I took this picture of my desk last year at around New Year’s time. I took it out of humour because I couldn’t help but laugh at the extent to which my desk had fallen into disarray. It was so extreme that I felt I had to capture it. But the main reason I took it was to remind me never to let such a mess happen again.

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Last night when I was sorting through photos on my desktop and came across it again, I was struck by a rather philosophical idea: Why do we make New Year’s resolutions? Why is it so necessary for us to feel like we have a fresh start—a new chance to change for the better?

I think one reason is that we feel the need to learn from the past and move on.

And the beautiful thing about life is that every New Year—every day really—we get a fresh start to take a snap shot of what went wrong and put it behind us, moving towards a better future.

In my experience being a part of YPY, but also in many other outreach and service-related things I’ve done, I have met many people who suffer the pain caused by choices that they had made in the past. I would venture to say that some of the deepest pain I have seen has been the pain experienced by women who have lost their children.

Abortion is a tragedy in that it ends the life of a child, but it is also a tragedy for that child’s mother. The choice to have an abortion is very often a choice that is accompanied by hurt, rejection, and fear, regardless of the quick relief that it might bring to an extremely stressful situation.

This last year has left thousands of women hurting from abortion and I sincerely hope that each one receives the love and support that she needs to heal. I truly hope that this New Year can be one of healing and new life for every woman who has had to experience the trauma of abortion.


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All I Want for Christmas…

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by Kamilah Thorpe

We all know that giving gifts to those we love brings joy. Every Christmas parents, grandparents, aunts and uncles lavish the children in their lives with Christmas presents—small or big, expensive or inexpensive. Giving gifts is a sign of love.

I’ve experienced working in a toy store and had the pleasure of seeing many adults come in and pick out the perfect gift for a child, putting thought and affection—not to mention an economic investment—into their gift. The children who receive those gifts at Christmas are loved. They are wanted.

I ask myself why it is that some children are not.

Why is it that some children in the womb are awaited with joyful expectation while others are considered a curse to be rid of? Does the number of presents under the tree decide which child has worth and which child is worthless? Do wanted children have more of a right to life than those who are unwanted?

Abortion takes away the life of a child because that life is not wanted.

My wish this Christmas is that each child be loved regardless of the sacrifice it might take to give them a chance at life.

My wish this Christmas is that all children be wanted for who they are, regardless of the circumstances in which they come because every child is precious.


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The Fetus is NOT a Parasite

filepicker-Lsw6ycvxTzShnhYb1WFI_fetusBy Angela Beare

This parasitic notion of pregnancy is disconcerting at best, but the fact remains that there have previously been misunderstandings surrounding the distribution of nutrients and energy to the fetus during a pregnancy. The medical definition of parasite is compound, i.e. a definition with two necessary parts. It implies not only that an organism is “living in, with, or on another organism” – a point that would apply in the case of a fetus, but also that that existence entails a degree of harm or is a detriment to the host, i.e. a parasite as a cause of disease.1 The parasitic notion of pregnancy is based on the misconception that the needs of the fetus take precedence over those of the mother, thus putting the mother at risk of inadequate amounts of energy and nutrients. For any human being, an inadequate absorption of nutrients is at the root of many diseases and health complications. If the precedence of the fetus were the mechanism at play during pregnancy, there would be a possibility that the presence of the fetus were causing a degree of harm to the mother, and the argument for a parasitic notion of pregnancy could be re-assessed. However, this phenomenon has been scientifically disproven.

The nutritional status of a pregnant woman is determined first and foremost by the foods and supplements that she ingests. Her needs are fulfilled prior to the allocation of nutrients to the fetus. Some very interesting studies on this topic have been conducted based on the statistics of the Dutch famine of 1944-45. The disruption in the nutritional status of the mothers was, on average, no more severe than that of other non-pregnant women who lived through the famine. However, the adverse effects on the fetuses carried by these pregnant women had long-term consequences which are under study to the present day. Even at critical windows of fetal development, the required nutrients were not delivered to the fetus until the mother’s requirements had been fulfilled. Many consequences have been identified as a result of the allocation of nutrients to the bodies of pregnant mothers before the children in their wombs.2, 3

So what does all this mean to the pro-life cause? Is the fact that the fetus is not a parasite one more set of attestable facts we can add to our reserve of pro-life apologetics? Does it boil down to the reassurance that science is “on our side”? Although these and many other compelling facts about fetal development are invaluable to the movement, the bare truth remains that abortion is not only about facts. It is about people. It is about human beings. Most specifically, it is about two human beings – a woman and the child within her womb. When a woman finds herself in a crisis pregnancy situation, it is not likely Dutch famine statistics and nutrient battles that overwhelm her thoughts. It is the stress of her present situation, the undeniable attachment to her child, and the questions about the future of herself and her child. She may be struggling with very real personal difficulties, to which we may or may not be able to relate. As pro-lifers, we must not judge and condemn, but rather offer our compassion and support. The real and ultimate goal of our efforts is that mother and baby will both make it through those nine months – alive!

Parasite. Merriam-Webster Dictionary online
2 Prenatal nutrition and the human fetus. Nutr Rev. 1971 Sep;29(9):197-9.
3 Effects of prenatal exposure to the Dutch famine on adult disease in later life: an overview. Twin Res. 2001 Oct ;4(5):293-8.

Re-blogged with author’s permission from uOttawa Students For Life


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Press Release- October 3rd 2013

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

FORMER PRO-LIFE CLUB PRESIDENT SUES THE UNIVERSITY OF VICTORIA FOR INFRINGING UPON FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION

Victoria, BC (October 3 2013) – On September 26th, 2013, Cam Côté, representative and past president of the pro-life club at the University of Victoria (Youth Protecting Youth (YPY)), filed a constitutional lawsuit against the University of Victoria in the BC Supreme Court.

The lawsuit, which seeks to restore YPY’s freedom of speech and expression on its campus, is in response to a number of discriminatory actions the University of Victoria has taken against the club. This includes the university’s cancellation of a previously approved “Choice” Chain event, the suspension of the club’s outdoor booking privileges for a year, and threats to punish club members who participate in similar events in the future.

This “Choice” Chain event, which involves club members peacefully engaging students in dialogue while holding signs of either aborted fetuses or naturally developing pre-born humans, was approved by the University until the day before it was scheduled to occur. The University then reversed their initial decision and cancelled the event, citing the University of Victoria Student Society’s (UVSS) 2012 assertion that this event constituted harassment under their harassment policy.

“We were very disappointed when our university administration upheld the UVSS’s efforts to censor our message. We hope that this petition will ensure YPY’s right to freedom of speech and expression on campus,” says Côté, now graduated and working as an Activism Coordinator for the Canadian Centre for Bio-Ethical Reform.

“A university cannot censor students when they deem their views to be unpopular and the promotion of these views to be potentially disconcerting to others. Freedom of expression is essential to a university, particularly when the issue at hand – abortion – is a matter of life and death for pre-born Canadians.”

The BC Civil Liberties Association has joined Cam Côté as a co-petitioner, and together they are represented by Craig Jones, Q.C., and Emily Unrau of Branch MacMaster LLP.

For further information contact:

Cam Côté (YPY Representative) 778 678 4275

ccote@unmaskingchoice.ca

Youth Protecting Youth

youthprotectingyouth@gmail.com

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Year in Review: 2012-2013

At the beginning of this school year, we talked about what was new with YPY. So what have we accomplished since then? As with all pro-life activism that engages people, the results of our work can’t fully be determined or quantified. Who knows how many students reconsidered their position on abortion after reading a pamphlet, seeing a picture, or talking with someone who treated them with respect? But it can be useful to review quantifiable activities, so here’s this year in review:

Activities

Club members gave about 25 man/woman-hours of “Choice” Chain and pamphleting, handing out over 2700 pamphlets. They chalked 20 chalkboards for about 20 weeks during the semesters. The club added more than 30 new people to the regular email list, and our president gave four presentations to classes. We held three apologetics workshops which were attended by all active members at one point or another.

Events

Events included two successful open houses with a total of about 30 curious students attending and many good conversations. Over 130 bought tickets for the Gala fundraiser. The club sent a representative to the NCLN (National Campus Life Network) symposium in Toronto. YPY’s annual $1000 bursary was provided to a young mother from Campbell River. The club showed the documentary “It’s a Girl,” which addresses the issue of gendercide.

Online

We also held a blog-writing workshop to equip our members to contribute to the blog. We published 12 (now 13) blog articles since September 2012. The blog received over 5000 views in this time, making for a total of over 28,000 views. 237 facebook users “like” our page and if every one of them posted an article, over 92,000 people could see it.

In conclusion, we’d like to thank everyone who’s contributed to this year’s success, especially the executive members. We would love to have you join YPY in our life-saving efforts. With your help, next year will be even better.


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Abortion Firsthand

A few women have told me that they had abortions. When that happens I try to listen compassionately to their stories, which are tragically so common. But as soon as we began the display on that Saturday, I got the chance to learn from someone with a different kind of experience.

“Choice” Chain is a pro-life activism activity that involves engaging passersby in dialogue while holding photographs that show what abortion does to a baby. I participate in Choice Chain in hopes that fewer abortions will happen as a result. Sometimes people assume that condemning women who have had abortions is the goal, but it’s not at all. Showing the pictures is an effective way to spread the life-saving truth: abortion kills a human being. I’ve seen tons of positive interactions and changed minds; I’ve even met a child who was saved from abortion when his mother saw the signs. But during “Choice” Chain a few weeks ago, it was my turn to learn about abortion.

At first I assumed the man who approached me was being rude. He pointed to the picture of the aborted fetus: “I’ve cut up thousands of those.” But I sensed a sincerity that belied his words. “What do you mean?” I asked. He is a pathologist at Victoria General Hospital. He had indeed cut pieces from thousands of aborted babies for samples. I didn’t ask his name, and I don’t think he would’ve given it. He thought we might be interested to hear what he had to say because we’re not likely to get such information otherwise. He was right. I’ve known for a while that approximately 300 abortions happen every day in Canada but I’d never heard about it firsthand from someone who deals with the aftermath.

“Some are quite a bit older than that” he said, pointing to a sign showing an 8-week old aborted fetus. He had obtained tissue from thousands of dead babies every year, some of which were at least as old as the 2nd-trimester neonatal preemies that, instead of being aborted, were treated with delicate care. He described gently and carefully obtaining blood from preemies that could just as easily have been aborted, sampled and thrown in the trash. He said “I used to be more on the pro-choice side, but seeing so many of these makes you think about it.” When you take samples from aborted fetuses you can see the body parts. It makes you think twice “when someone drops a jar and the abortion falls on the floor and blood goes everywhere and everybody can see what it is.” [this is a graphic video showing “what it is”]

The grim realities this man described don’t belong to the Kermit Gosnell abortion clinic murder trial, a story that is presently horrifying many on both sides of the issue. They belong to the local hospital. They describe things that happen regularly.

The pathologist thought we’d be interested to know just who gets abortions. Apparently young women roughly 17-20 are most common. Situations surrounding abortion are often complicated, but pro-lifers hold that every innocent death is tragic. So in that sense, the age of the woman doesn’t make a difference. But he went on: Women from about 20 to 35 get relatively few abortions. Instead, the second most common group is women of about 35 and up. That was surprising. He suggested they’d had enough kids and didn’t want larger families, or they didn’t want the higher risk of complications associated with pregnancies near the end of childbearing years.

He really didn’t like how “anybody can get an abortion for any reason” but he didn’t say he was pro-life. He was adamant to discuss it with “ideology aside.” He didn’t get behind religious or other “ideological” oppositions to abortion. Instead he told me that he just wants people to know the truth. I should’ve pointed out that many of us who call ourselves “pro-life” have the same straightforward, untwisted aim.

He said that everyone is sent down to Victoria to get abortions; none are performed up-island. He attributed this to pro-life activism in some communities on Vancouver Island. I’m not sure if that’s common knowledge or not but I hope this is encouraging to those activists. He also noted that whenever a medical study comes out that is not in favour of abortion, even in the interest of the health of the mother, it is shouted down. “Ideology aside” again, he was frustrated that, as a medical person, you can’t even discuss these possibilities.

He thanked us for being out on the street and said that people need to see the pictures. I offered him a business card for “Silent No More,” thinking that their healing mission might help him. He said he didn’t need it – “I’m fine.” Despite his confidence, I think he wished, with some bitterness, that everyone knew what he did for a living. He seemed easygoing, confident and friendly. Looking back now I wonder why he opened our conversation so candidly: “I’ve cut up thousands of those.” What do you say to that? I first thought he was trying to get a rise out of me so I was calm. But maybe outrage would have been better – maybe outrage would have validated his experience. Because abortion is truly outrageous, and this man had seen the results firsthand.


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“It’s a Girl”

 

 

 

Evan Grae Davis has shot documentaries about human rights abuses from Africa to the Amazon. He didn’t initially set out to make a film about gendercide; he and his crew were travelling throughout India looking to shoot a documentary on human trafficking. “Nothing prepared us for what we discovered,” he says. 

 

In India, China and many other parts of the world today, girls are killed, aborted and abandoned simply because they are girls. The United Nations estimates as many as 200 million girls are missing in the world today because of this so-called “gendercide”.

 

Girls who survive infancy are often subject to neglect, and many grow up to face extreme violence and even death at the hands of their own husbands or other family members.

 

Get informed about this compelling issue and join YPY for the UVic showing of “It’s a Girl” on Wednesday, March 27th in MacLaurin D288. Admission is free.

Facebook Event

 

http://www.itsagirlmovie.com/